True Story: I Finished the Whole30

by Lindsey

There’s a great episode of This American Life called “The Seven Things You’re Not Supposed to Talk About,” in which Sarah Koenig (yes, that Sarah Koenig #SerialForever) hosts an entire show about her mother’s rules for conversation. One of the seven forbidden topics is diet. Normally, I would agree. As annoying as I find people who constantly talk about how they aren’t eating gluten or refried beans or whatever, I hate being that person even more. I was a semi-vegetarian (no red meat; bacon got me back) for about ten years, and I was always a little uneasy when someone would offer me something I couldn’t try or I pretended to eat a pork chop at a dinner party.  I just wanted to eat what I wanted without having to explain myself or inconvenience others by trying to accommodate my choices. I take a quiet, libertarian philosophy when it comes to many things, including dietary choices.

So, with that, dear readers: leave now if you don’t want to hear about what I’ve been eating lately. I won’t blame you.  Just know that I’m writing this because 1. my blog, my choice, and 2. I’ve felt very encouraged reading the stories of others on a journey to healthier habits (especially updates from Diana of Our City Lights). If you want to stick around, I’ll share a little of why I decided to go this route, followed by things I’ve learned. Ready? Let’s go.

First things first, I love to eat. Every vacation is built around trying the local fare, including as much ice cream and as many doughnuts as I can stomach. Kelsey and I still cry about missing Salt & Straw when we were in Portland. (We tried to find it and got very lost, but that’s a story for another day.) Anyway, as you may recall from my body image post and our New Year’s resolutions list, I hit a health hurdle last year. I started a medication that helped me gain around 30 pounds in one year. Because of that, my cholesterol shot up. Yikes, right?

I’ll admit that I wasn’t too keen on trying to change my habits. First, I didn’t want to sacrifice mental health for physical health when it came to my medicine. And I was scared to switch medicines, because I’m an anxious person. It’s a vicious cycle. Then, as someone who has long struggled with body image, finally embracing who I am – curvy shape, extra pounds and all – it was hard mentally to go back to the place of needing to change something about myself. To fix my cholesterol, I needed to lose weight, but trying to lose weight felt like giving up my principles about embracing my perfectly imperfect body. In the end, I decided health means more than principles. I switched my medicine over Christmas break and decided to go for it.

Thus, armed with a medical reason and new resolve, I started the Whole30 Program. A friend mentioned this program to me last summer, and I’ll admit that I thought she was crazy. You have to give up ALL grains, dairy, legumes, added sugar and alcohol for 30 days? Ridiculous and impossible, I thought. I read some of the It Starts With Food book that explains the program, and I remained skeptical. No one is ever going to convince me that whole grains, dairy and legumes are inherently bad for me. I’m a believer in whole foods and moderation (even when I don’t quite practice what I believe…mmm…doughnuts). In the end, I chose the Whole30 because it seemed like a good, cold-turkey, jump-start to health.

I’ve now reached the end of my 30 days, and I’m really glad I chose this route. Most importantly, it showed me that I have the discipline to make real changes in my daily habits. Aside from taking communion twice (“What Would Jesus Eat?”) and eating bacon/ham with added sugar, I didn’t break protocol that I know of. That’s not to say it’s been easy. My first day of the program, my generous coworkers offered me cheesecake, a cupcake and gourmet flavored popcorn. In one day. I felt like I was going through some kind of temptation scenario with the devil, even though it was communion that broke me. Go figure.

Anywho, I’ve been thinking a lot about what I’ve learned during this month, and I thought I’d share my top seven takeaways.

  1. My favorite thing about the Whole30 is that it really made me think about what I was eating. Because I had to look for added sugars, I learned how many foods feature added sugars. Not eating whole food groups had me rethink staple, fallback meals. Fast food was off the table, thankfully. (Except for Chipotle. Until they stopped carrying carnitas. Sigh.) I hope to continue this type of thoughtful consumption over the long haul.
  2. It reignited my cooking habit. Before I moved to Nashville, I worked at a job that paid about $23,000 a year. I had to really budget, and that meant I had to cook my own meals basically all the time. Since moving, I’ve done very little cooking. I’ve gotten lazy, eating sugary cereal for dinner or grabbing a sandwich and fries on my way home. The Whole30 forced me to cook my own meals and try new recipes. My favorite meal was this salmon with roasted potatoes and broccoli. CheckCilantro Lime Salmon and Veggies out my Pinterest page for plenty of Whole30 recipes (and desserts I’m currently lusting after). Oh, and it is possible to bake brownies without licking the batter or tasting one hot out of the oven. (Cue 98 Degrees’ “The Hardest Thing.”)
  3. The Whole30 is hard, but it’s not that hard. A coworker was talking just yesterday about a “cleanse” he did for 10 days where all he “ate” was water with lemon, cayenne pepper and maple syrup. Now tell me, how is that healthy or sustainable? Detox, shmetox. I’ve been eating healthy, whole foods for 30 days. Yes, I complained about a lack of chocolate, cheese and toast, but I didn’t starve myself.
  4. I’ve always been one of those people that gets really hungry really quickly. I would have those times when I had a sugar drop and felt like I needed to eat everything in sight as quickly as possible to make up the deficit. Surprisingly, I did not experience that on this program. By eating less sugar overall, my blood and appetite felt more stable. It allowed me to think before eating and better evaluate hunger without getting to an unstable, hangry point.
  5. Trader Joe’s is heaven. Yes, it’s crowded and you’ll spend 15+ minutes looking for parking, but it is truly a lifesaver if you’re trying to eat healthy without spending your entire paycheck at Whole Foods. Some of my favorite finds included: packaged ghee (pan fry some sweet potatoes in it, and you’ll be so happy), freeze-dried fruit (amazing snack), almond butter (relatively cheap and necessary for my kind of Whole30) and coconut products (coconut cream, coconut flour, etc. etc.). Just make sure to avoid the Cookie Butter. Walk away. You can cry in the car.
  6. Though overall health is the point, I have started losing weight. Currently, I’m down about 10 pounds, which I feel like is a great start. I’ve started exercising more consistently, too. Take that, high cholesterol!
  7. I’ve seen stories about people on the Whole30 suddenly being cured of skin diseases, sleeping better, etc. I don’t doubt their good fortune, but I don’t have any drastic news to report on these fronts. For me, it would never call it a miracle program, but it is one that has helped me become a more mindful consumer. I feel good, and I’m grateful for that.
  8. A lifestyle change doesn’t stop at 30 days. If you’ve read about the program, you know there’s a food reintroduction phase. You learn how different foods affect your system, and work from there. For example, I’ll eat lots of legumes tomorrow and see what happens. Come at me peanut butter. Post putting foods back in my life/body, I’m planning to transition to a more Mediterranean/whole foods diet, which includes plenty of whole grains. Sorry, Whole30. I have to find what healthy eating means to me. Next on my reading list is Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food and the 100 Days of Real Food blog to keep me motivated toward whole, clean eating. I’m also going to try the whole, “If you want it, you have to make it” philosophy of junk food. Want cookies? Break out the chocolate chips at home. I hope it will help me think through how much I really want to eat certain foods. Do I want it bad enough to take the time to make it? Maybe, maybe not.

The final moral of the story? I’ll see you soon, ice cream. I just won’t see you as often.

I hope some small part of this has been helpful or enlightening. Whether you choose the Whole30 or another dietary program/lifestyle change, here’s wishing you health and happiness, friends.

Advertisements

Favorite Books on Art

by Lindsey

unnamedIf you know me, you know my love of art is deep and boundless. I can spend hours in a museum. I studied arts administration in grad school (because of aforementioned museum interest). I am fascinated by copyright law and appropriation and controversy. I get really fired up when people don’t like a piece simply because, “I could have done that.” [Insert angry eye roll here.]

What most people don’t know is that I didn’t major in art history at any point. My graduate degree was largely about nonprofit management (with an arts focus, but still). All that to say: I really don’t know that much about art. However, though love of something doesn’t necessarily equal knowledge about something, it typically translates into a desire to know more. Thus, I am an avid reader of books about art/artists/museums/your mom. (Just threw that last one in there to see if you were paying attention.)

Here are my favorites for all you art history or should-have-been-art-history-majors out there:

The $12 Million Dollar Stuffed Shark     (Thompson)

This book offers an exciting look at art economics (artonomics?). Seriously. Why are you laughing? If you’ve ever wondered how, as the cover depicts, a stuffed shark might fetch $12 million, this is the book for you. It covers auctions, dealers, critics, museums, specific artists/sales, and so much more. One of my favorite sections is about how color relates to price/desire.

Seven Days in the Art World     (Thornton)

This title is pretty self-explanatory. Thornton dives head first into seven of the art world’s most well-known arenas, beginning with “The Auction” and ending with “The Biennale.” She offers a wide view of the art world at a specific span of time (the late 2000s) by running its bases for the reader’s benefit.

Lives of the Artists: Portraits of Ten Artists Whose Work and Lifestyles Embody the Future of Contemporary Art     (Tomkins)

Lives of the Artists seems like one of those books you might be assigned in grad school (in a good way). If you can’t tell from my list and a conspiculous lack of Renaissance and ancient art texts, I’m a modern/contemporary art fan. On top of that, I’m fascinated by how artists work, so vignettes into their lives really works for me.

The Rescue Artist     (Dolnick)

Art and crime are two of my favorite subjects. Add them together, and I am a happy, happy girl. Well, I mean, I don’t like crime, per se, but I like reading about crime. Do I wish the Scream had never been stolen? Yes. Do I want to read about it since it was stolen, as this book accounts? YES.

The Participatory Museum     (Simon)

 So, technically this is a book more about museums and less about art/artists…but this is my list, and I’ll put what I want on it.  If you want to get into my niche fascinations with the art/museum world, you’d land squarely into the museums as third places/participatory art experiences/audience cultivation and contribution, etc. So, when I found this book, I fell instantly in love. Nina Simon is my real life, present day hero.  (You should also check out her blog, and feel free to pass along job openings you find at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History.)

On my nightstand:

Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World’s Stolen Treasures     (Wittman)

 This book is in my purse right now, just waiting for lunchtime to roll around. I miss Serial and I need some intrigue in my cultural consumption.

33 Artists in 3 Acts     (Thornton)

Sarah Thornton’s follow up to the aforementioned Seven Days in the Art World gets an automatic spot on my reading list.

What Are You Looking At?: The Surprising, Shocking, and Sometimes Strange Story of 150 Years of Modern Art     (Gompertz)

The description alone was enough for me to bite: “Every year, millions of museum and gallery visitors ponder the modern art on display and secretly ask themselves, ‘Is this art?’ A former director at London’s Tate Gallery and now the BBC arts editor, Will Gompertz made it his mission to bring modern art’s exciting history alive for everyone, explaining why an unmade bed or a pickled shark can be art—and why a five-year-old couldn’t really do it.” Yes, let’s all learn how a five-year-old really couldn’t do it, folks. Really, really. REALLY.

Happy reading, folks.

Author’s note: I sourced links from Amazon, but, if you want to buy independent, allow me to recommend Parnassus Books.

2015 “Resolutions”

by Kelsey (and a little Lindsey)

Happy 2015, Kittens.

Before we move on to the Resolutions, here’s the thing —

Spoiler Alert: I don’t believe in new year’s resolutions.

If one isn’t likely to begin doing something on any of the other 11 months of the year, there’s nothing about January that will solidify one’s lamentable will power. It’s just not going to happen.

Plus, now that the Christmas season is over, I am fully planning my descent into the veritable Swamp of Sadness (if you caught that reference, we could be friends) a.k.a. January by stocking up on sweatpants and discount-priced Reese’s Christmas Trees. There is nothing about January that makes me want to do anything but watch Netflix.

But that said, I am likely somewhere in the world’s 90th percentile of list-makers and Post-It users (don’t worry, I recycle). So here are some “resolutions” that I’m currently working on or have on my to-do list:

Watch Buffy the Vampire Slayer Series

Clearly we’re starting at the easy end of my list. I’ve heard great things about this series for years, and I am all about shows/films with a strong female lead. Lindsey has also been on my case to watch it. I’m almost through with the first season, and I have no regrets. It also has a surprising lineup of one-liners that make me laugh, which I wasn’t anticipating. Also, it was made in the 90s, so have some understanding in the special effects department.

Stop Comparing Myself to Strangers on the Internet (via Emily McDowell)

This print and mantra is on the top of my 1) to purchase list and 2) to do list. It’s just so true. I follow so many friends and also inspirational designers/writers/creators on Instagram/Twitter/Blogs etc., that it’s easy to be discouraged comparing what seems like my meager existence to all of these rock stars. Things are never really what they seem: STOP. IT.

Be Grateful

I am a pessimist. This is often projected as a predetermined setting, which vindicates all culpability for one’s own perspective. I don’t really think this is true, but I also know that changing something so deeply ingrained is difficult and lengthy. And although I also don’t think that all pessimists are deeply unhappy trolls of sadness, that mindset does not lend itself to one of gratefulness (or health/happiness). Thus, one of my biggest current undertakings. How to go about this? See some tips/more info at FastCompany and NYTimes.

Mindfulness Meditation

I have a meditation book on my Kindle that I’ve restarted about 3 different times throughout the past 2-3 years. I know that meditation has amazing benefits (via FastCompany), but I find it very difficult to do. That said, mindfulness meditation is again making its way to the top of my agenda. See also FastCo’s other articles for people who hate meditation here — a look at the evolution of mindfulness in modern culture here — and as a combat for anxiety here.

Reading Bedtime

Guys, screens are bad for us (she types, staring at a screen). Recently I’ve been trying to set a “reading bedtime” for myself, where one hour before I plan to go to sleep, I shut off all of my screens and read. If you have an issue with falling asleep while reading at night, I might suggest not reading in bed (check out that underutilized couch/chair instead) or go to bed earlier (9:00 PM goal for this lady). And it’s so much easier on my brain to check-out when I get home from work by watching Netflix. Largely due to this committed relationship with Netflix, my reading game is getting behind. Reading bedtime FTW.

Learn to Code

With the plethora of resources (many free) at our disposal these days, there is no excuse for not getting out there to gain some coding skills. And ladies, we’re behind.  And the benefits are many, from website building to career advancing.

Now, I’ll turn this over to Lindsey for a couple of her current goals…

Get Healthy

Yes, I realize everyone and their mom (literally) wants to lose weight, blah blah blah after the holidays. I’ve been that person. This year, however, I’m trying something new for health reasons. As I mentioned, I put on a lot of medication-related weight this year. As a result, my cholesterol isn’t the greatest. Thus, I’m starting January with the Whole30 (basically really strict paleo) challenge and an exercise routine. I’m not one to follow fad diets, but I figure a hard switch to veggies and such should help me initially lessen my junk eating habits. I turn 30 in 2016 (aaarrrrggggghhhh!), so now is a good time to get healthy for good, don’t you think?

Planner Time

I’ve been a slacker when it comes to writing down life’s moments and keeping organized. I bought my old stand-by, and I’m ready to start filling it up.

Floss

You know those people who only floss a week before the dental appointment (out of fear) and a week after (out of fresh motivation)? That’s me. I always say I’ll do better, and then lazily brush and go to sleep. Well, I’ve got a pack of those flosser stick things, and I’m ready to show plaque who’s boss.

Whatever your resolutions (or lack of), we’re hoping great things for 2015.

It’s a Wonderful Tradition

by Lindsey

Friends (if you’re the Christmas-celebrating type) it’s that time of year again. Happy Christmas Eve! We Left/Right sisters interrupt this evening to talk a little about our holiday traditions.

I think traditions are most important to me during this time of year. I take comfort in routine on a daily basis, so the extra special routines in which my whole family participates are a huge bonus for me. So what are those Christmas Eve/Christmas traditions we hold so dear?

Christmas Eve “oyster” soup: For some reason (we’ve heard differing), the Solomon side of our family always makes oyster soup for Christmas Eve. We “kids” (anyone under the age of 35) do not like oyster soup. We like barbecue. We eat barbecue instead. The tradition is slowly shifting…

unnamed-2

You can’t tell, but that’s It’s a Wonderful Life on the TV.

It’s a Wonderful Life: We always always have to watch It’s a Wonderful Life on Christmas Eve. I typically fall asleep a third of the way through and wake up for the happy ending. Kelsey has developed a fascinating theory that Potter isn’t really the villain of the story, but it’s Uncle Billy that causes all the trouble. If he were more competent, he could have taken over the Building and Loan. He also wouldn’t have lost all the money. Oh, we hate you Uncle Billy. (But I love you, Jimmy Stewart. Hot dog!)

Kelsey’s recitation of “Twas the Night Before Christmas”: Kelsey memorized this famed poem sometime in elementary school, and she’s been showing off every Christmas Eve since. Just kidding. Her memory is pretty great. I can sing the preamble to the Constitution, but no one wants to hear that.

unnamed-1

Cousins, Christmas 2012

Family, family, family: For me, the best part of the holidays is family time. We get to catch up with all of our cousins, uncles, aunts, etc. We drink wine, we play games, and we generally have a fantastic time. It’s the best.

So, from the Solomon sisters to you fine folk: happy Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanza/any other holiday with traditions you love! We’ll see you next year.

New Tunes Volume 1

by Kelsey
Greetings, All. I’m starting this “New Tunes” section of the Left/Right Blog in the hopes that we all might share in some mutual musical enjoyment.

And just because these artists/songs are new to me, doesn’t necessarily mean they’re brand new on the scene. And I’m a fan of multiple music genres, so you can expect some variety.

December Picks:

Laura Welsh – “Break the Fall”

I hear a touch of Florence + the Machine in this particular song, but her sound is uniquely her own. Check out her newest single Ghost here. Her debut album Soft Control is out January 19th, and I AM EXCITED.

Purity Ring – “Push Pull”

I have been a fan of Purity Ring for some time now, and they are absolutely my favorite driving music. For my favorite track, see Fineshrine. Their second LP record is anticipated for a 2015 release.

Years & Years – “Take Shelter”

This breakout band is feeling major love from their native England, with their spring UK tour already sold out. Sadly this track is not yet available in the US, but their other EPs (Real and Traps) should tide you over for now.

Ryn Weaver – “OctaHate”

Prepare to get this song stuck in your head. For some background on Ryn, check out Buzzfeed’s profile (from this past summer) here. Enjoy. Also check out Cashmere Cat’s remix of this tune here.

Imaginary Cities – “Where’d All The Living Go”

Let’s slow things down. 2010’s Temporary Resident is my favorite record of this great little band. Perfect for quiet winter evenings at home.

When to Spend

by Lindsey and Kelsey

There comes a time in every (non-trust fund supported) adult’s life, when he or she must start looking at price tags. When we start paying for things with our own money, strange things start to happen. Maybe you keep buying Tide detergent because it’s what your mom always bought without ever thinking, “Hmm, Squeaky McBubbles detergent is much cheaper, so maybe I should give it a whirl.” There’s a certain kind of comfort in familiar packaging. Or, if you’re price conscious, maybe you’ve frequently ventured into the generic or store brand product world. Spending less on a product of equal quality can be oh, so satisfying.

IMG_1202

This is our cousin’s cat, Maz. He’s a big spender.

While we Left/Right ladies encourage your thrifty explorations, there are some household and toiletry products for which we’re not willing to compromise. Some of these are generics that have tried and failed to woo us, and some are the “just nopes” that we can’t bring ourselves to sacrifice. We all make choices. These are ours.

Lindsey

Frozen Waffles

When I got out of grad school, it was 2010 and nonprofit jobs were hard to come by. I worked for a little under a year at a college library, which paid…well, not much. I scrimped and saved and tried all kinds of cheap food. Some were good. Some were bad. Storebrand/offbrand frozen waffles – a staple in my freezer for quick breakfasts or lazy dinners – fell into the latter bad category. Nothing compares to Eggo brand waffles. Nothing. Trust me.

Lipstick/BalmRed

As a youngster, I bought ALL the makeup. Hot pink blush. Teal eyeliner. I tried it all. Experimental was my middle name. (Now it’s just Shea.) Anyway, as an adult I’ve settled into a low maintenance beauty routine. Moisturizer only on lazy days. Light foundation, blush and neutral shadow to work. Mascara and eyeliner only on special occasions. The one constant every day? Lipstick or lip balm. If that’s main the makeup category where I spend my money, I want the good stuff.  Current favorites (from most color to least) are: NARS Fire Down Below, Clinique Whole Lotta Honey, Fresh Sugar Rosé Tinted Lip Treatment and Smith’s Rosebud Salve. If you want one lip product, pick Smith’s. I want to be buried with it.

Kelsey

Coffee

My name is Kelsey, and I’m a coffee snob. But, let’s be honest, I really don’t feel any shame about this fact. I’ve always enjoyed coffee, but ever since I landed myself a grown-up job, a coffee beverage has become an integral part of my leisurely morning. I will get up early, just so I can laze around for an extra 30 minutes casually sipping my soy latte. I grind my own coffee, and I order whole beans from Stumptown (in Portland) about once a month. It’s so worth it.

Writing UtensilsIMG_0219

Being left-handed, I’m obsessed with nearly any writing utensil that makes pushing my pen/pencil across the page a little easier to manage (vs. lucky right-handers that glide right with ease). This action almost always results in a fine patina of graphite or ink on the side of my hand (left-handed shout out: I know that you all know what I’m talking about). That said, I also write very small and precisely, so I prefer a .3 or .5 engineering pencil (faves: GraphGear 1000 ; rOtring 600 ) as well as fine point felt-tipped pens, as they dry quickly (faves: Le Pen ; Sakura Micron ). Fountain pens are also included in my pen indulgences (fave: Lamy).

Both

Toilet Paper

So, we split the “both” category between us, and I, Lindsey, ended up with toilet paper. I’m kind of stoked about it, to be honest. This is a product we all use every day. Every. single. day. I cannot scrimp on an item so important to daily life. That thin, hotel grade slop? No thank you. Not only is comfort an issue, but say you want to grab a square to sneeze or blot your lipstick? It won’t work, I tell you. If you’re going to splurge, treat your booty to the best. Oh, and for the record, Kelsey and I differ on what’s best. I prefer Cottonelle Clean Care, while the kid buys Charmin Ultra Soft. The choice is yours.

Skincare

Whereas I (Kelsey) save all the money on makeup compared to my sisterface (because I don’t wear it), I make up for that (get it?) by my obnoxious number of skincare products. Funny thing is that while my skin was never that rebellious as a teenager, you can still get acne for the first time in your twenties (stress is real, you guys). The best thing that I have found for my at-the-moment angry skin is a retinoid cream. You can find this stuff OTC, but you may also procure a prescription for a stronger variety. It has SO MANY BENEFITS from helping with acne to reducing/preventing wrinkles etc. etc. Moving on,  Lindsey and I have recently been using the same Clinique moisturizer with SPF, that we adore. If you need any encouragement to use SPF on a daily basis, see here. Finally, a shout-out to Kiehl’s for having an amazing alcohol-free toner.

What about you, dear readers? Anything you’d add to the list?

Lenita’s Chocolate Pie

by Kelsey 

This recipe is brought to you by my friend Anna’s grandmother, Lenita. Anna made this pie in college a few times, and the first time, I probably demurred something about preferring cake to pie then proceeded to eat it straight out of the pan with my friends. To this day, it is one of the very few pies that I genuinely adore.

I’m made this delight a few times since college, and I still eat it much the same: wearing sweatpants, standing over the counter in my kitchen, fork in hand. Plates are for amateurs.

The recipe is below (to make 1 pie), with a few additional comments from me (i.e. how not to make my mistakes):

1 ‘deep’ dish pie crust.  She used the frozen ones and you bake it for about 2-3 minutes before you add the filling. (if I’m using a frozen pie crust, I’ll throw it into the oven at the same temp. for the pie-baking: 350 degrees. I’ve also made homemade pie crust once, which I did not regret, although I did regret making it too thick/not cooking it long enough beforehand).

Filling

  • 1 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 cup cocoa.                Get a good one like Hershey’s or similar. It’s worth it.
  • 3/4 stick butter               Don’t use light butter or margarine. (Words to live by, am I right?)
  • 1/4 T. vanilla
  • 1 can Pet evaporated milk
  • 3 egg yolks – beat well and set aside
In a double boiler (remember, fancy word for bowl over a pot of boiling water – I bought mine on – yes, you guessed it – Amazon) add sugar, flour and cocoa. Gradually stir in the Pet evaporated milk over low-medium heat for at least 5 minutes. If you don’t get it hot enough, it won’t cook. (Straight talk. I tend to put mine on medium-high. Also, keep a close eye to ensure that your water in the double boiler does not run dry.)
Sweet double boiler action.

Sweet double boiler action.

Take a few spoons of the hot mixture and add it to the beaten egg yolks. Stir well and then add a few more spoons and stir again. Gradually pour the egg yolk mixture into the bouble boiler and continue to stir and cook until thick.

Last, stir in butter and vanilla. Pour into pre-baked pie shell.
Meringue
  • 3 egg whites*
  • 1/4 t. vanilla
  • 1/4 t. cream of tarter
  • 1/3 c. sugar
Beat egg whites with electric mixture at high speed until foamy. Gradually add sugar, cream of tartar and vanilla until stiff peaks are visible when you lift up mixer out of meringue. Spread over the top of the pie filling. Bake 10 -15 minutes on 350 until golden brown.
*Real talk. For those that love to eat raw cookie dough and brownie batter as much as yours truly, I tend to  buy pasteurized eggs, as I’m also paranoid (read: salmonella). That said, pasteurized eggs, for some reason, do not make good meringue, folks. For this recipe, I suggest using non-pasteurized eggs. Also, I tend to use 4 eggs whites, because I don’t play around with meringue. I want some serious volume on this pie.
Look at that volume.

Look at that volume. If meringue were hair, this pie would have its own shampoo ad. You know what I mean.